Tilton Conservation Commission
                Tilton, NH
                                                                                                                                                                                                     

 

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CONSERVATION NEWS From TILTON NH
Tilton Conservation Commission, 257 Main Street, Tilton, NH 03276††††††††††††††††††††          Spring 2009

Spring 2009 Newsletter

 

Tree graphic     New Gateway to Tilton     Tree graphic
As you drive into Tilton from the north, be sure to check out the view of the rapids and swirling waters of the Winnipesaukee River
from a piece of property located just before the historic Truesdell Truss bridge. This land, which was formerly filled with construction equipment, now belongs to the town.And the town plans to make some changes.

On March 31, 2009, the Tilton Conservation Commission purchased the property after it had been evaluated by both a certified wetland scientist and an environmentalspecialist who assured the Commissionersthat the property was free from hazardous waste materials. The Commission was able to purchase the land using money from a current use change fund that was established for conservation purposes.

Now that the property has been acquired, the Commission is looking for volunteers to help restore the land with a spring cleaning and other beautification efforts. The Commission will also place a conservation easement on the property so that it will be available to the community for environmental uses forever. Some suggestions already received include using the space for a farmerís market and having an information booth to welcome visitors to the community. People who have suggestions should direct their ideas to the Tilton Conservation Commission at 257 Main Street or by email to info@tiltoncc.org

Public Input Sought Regarding Recent Land Purchase

The Tilton Conservation Commission will be holding 2 public hearings to receive input from residents on what activities would be allowed on its newly purchased land on East Main Street.This property is a long narrow piece situated between the Winnipesaukee River and Route 3/11.It has most recently been used by the prior owner to display used equipment until the town required the lot be cleaned up.Vegetables and Christmas trees have been sold at this location also.

The Commission will be placing a Conservation Easement on the property to protect the land and river frontage.Included in the easement will be a list of acceptable uses for the property.The Commission generally believes that a farmerís market or a small information booth would be appropriate uses and is looking for additional suggestions.

The public hearings will be held May 18 and June 15, both at 7:00 pm at the Tilton Town Hall.Suggestions can be emailed to info@tiltoncc.org.

 

 


Remember, Friends and Neighbors Ė

Tilton has some great outdoor recreation sites:

Buffalo Park

Riverfront Park

The Island (and many more)

so, as the weather warms up, go out to these locations, check for tracks
 and explore the serene environments as a decompression from your day.
Beauty can be found right in our backyards.
Check with Tiltonís Park Commission for more details.

                      Tracks chart                                                              

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Easy Directions for Composting

        You can even get your kids involved. First, you may be asking yourself: What is Composting?

        Nature recycles leaves and plants. In a forest, leaves fall forming mulch that protects the soil. Over time they decompose
        into nutrients that feed forest plants.

        Second, you might wonder: How do I set up a Composting Bin?

        Select a spot to set up your bin. It should be out of the way but convenient to reach with plenty of room to work around.
        Some good places would be near your garden or in a back corner of the yard.

        It is also a good idea to choose a location close to a source of water. The bin can be as simple as a three sided wooden box
        without a top, or something like this:

Compost bin

 

        Composting needs to include these basic ingredients:

        The micro-organisms that recycle leaves and other plant parts need an even mix of brown stuff
                and green stuff to munch on.
        They also need air and water to live and work. Put all this together and in time you will have compost!

        Recipe Ingredients:

           Compost ingredients 
                                                                                                    

   
   
Air and Water

    Brown Stuff (dead, dried plant parts like
    leaves and pine needles)
.
    Brown stuff is high in the element carbon.

    Green Stuff (fresh, living parts like grass
    clippings, kitchen vegetable
scraps,
    weeds and other plants).
    Green stuff is high in the element nitrogen.


       

 

 

       
Don't Use :   meat and milk products because pets and other animals may try to dig them up out of your
                               compost bin. Also, don't use diseased garden plants. They can spread disease back into
                               the garden later when you use the compost.
                            

        It is easiest to build a compost bin in layers of ingredients.
        Start with the brown stuff by spreading a layer of leaves or pine needles about 6 inches thick.
        Then add the green stuff,  then add some soil or compost to the pile to add microorganisms while all along
        each layer gets a watering as youlayer your bin and alternating the layers as it gets higher.
        Once you reach the top, the pile will break down into humus and in a few weeks youíll be ready
        to use your compost. If you want it to work faster, you can turn your compost pile each day to help it along.
        

      

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